Living With Bankruptcy In Connecticut

Monday, September 15, 2014
It can be extremely stressful when people find themselves strapped with so much debt they can't function well. As each have their own set of rules, there are a number of ways to deal with your debt depending on your overall financial situation. Declaring bankruptcy in Connecticut is just one of the many avenues you can take to being able to breathe again and not feel a cloud of dread descending over you every time the phone rings or you go to check the mail. The stress involving financial problems can be eliminated and your debt dealt with by filing for bankruptcy.

The first thing you should understand about bankruptcy is there are two types: reorganization and liquidation. Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy falls in the liquidation category. With this solution, you can sell your items in order to knock off some of your debt. You will be permitted to keep certain items as mandated under state laws which provides protection for specific valuables. If you apply for Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Connecticut, you’ll be filing for reorganizational bankruptcy. Chapter 13 is probably the most well-known of the reorganization bankruptcy. You’ll be able to keep everything that you own and instead of selling off your assets you will make monthly installments over the next three to five years to either repay all of the debt you owe or some of it.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy generally lasts three to six months, and any debt that remains after you’ve sold your property becomes unsecured debt. That unsecured debt will then be wiped out. Based upon your equity level, items you're able to possibly keep include clothing, furnishings and any vehicle you own. If you have any secured debts, like car loans, you can either let the creditor repossess them, keep paying for the item, or give the creditor enough money to equal the actual replacement value of your secured debt. For those who do file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, there are particular secured debts that can be eliminated. When it comes to Chapter 7 bankruptcy however, something to bear in mind is not everyone is able to qualify. If your disposable earnings are enough for you to qualify for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you won’t be allowed to file for Chapter 7. Chapter 7 bankruptcy also won’t do you any good if you owe tax debt, child support, or spousal support.

Before being allowed to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Connecticut, you’ll have to have a reliable source of income. A repayment schedule will have to be established that spans a three to five year period. Minimum monthly amounts is decided by how much your debt is, the amount of money you make and the amount of money you would have paid your unsecured creditors had you filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead. There are federal limits set in place for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Right now, you can’t have more than roughly $1,011,000 in secured debt and about $337,000 in unsecured debt. Before your creditors are permitted to take action against you, you will be allowed to make up any missed payments for your secured debts.

Look into bankruptcy options if you want to get a handle on your finances. It can definitely be worth considering even if it is not your very first option. Carefully look into your finances, research your options and think about the amount of debt you owe when attempting to make the best decision possible for any kind of bankruptcy.